14 Apr-12 May 2017 – Glamping on a glacier

Having far from satisfied our fix of Juneau in Southeast Alaska last summer, and fortuitously invited back—courtesy of a Fishhook Fatty hooking us up with a fellow biker—it didn’t take long to make preparations. Namely pack the panniers and head south to the ferry.

But only made possible thanks to Ian and Kristina, who tirelessly took us and the bikes in their truck on a 1,250-mile return trip. Blimey, that’s a long way in one day, guys! “Going the extra mile” is a weak term for how the Goodwins went above and beyond. Heck, it’s very possibly the understatement of our 3 year trip to date. And thus, avoiding the need for us to motorcycle over the snow-choked high pass to Haines and instead, safely make tracks onto rideable road. Thank you, both, dearly.

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16 Jan-13 Apr 2017 – Mad dogs and Englishmen, snow machines and mayhem

What had begun to feel like a protracted ice age—having spent half a year in a landscape leached of colour—followed the joyous onset of spring in Wasilla, Southcentral Alaska. Where the dominion of winter finally permits the release of snow and ice from her frozen prison. A new world about to mysteriously surface, bursting with energy, and the capacity to restore life in all its manifestations.

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#jasonspaffordphotography has arrived

Sincere apologies for the lack of blog posts recently–duly noted, your patience has been monumental. As you might’ve gathered, we spent the winter in Alberta hibernating which has given us the chance to experience our first Canadian winter, and with a buzzing motorcycling community we wouldn’t’ve missed for the world. Refreshingly, it’s facilitated taking a breather in order to recalibrate body and bikes for the splendid riding ahead…

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24 Sept 2016 – 15 Jan 2017 – Goodbye Pearl, two Canadian winter newbies & hello Mr Jangles

The thought of halting our trip was completely untenable. Coming up to three years in maintaining a steady momentum, why would we stop now? Yet staying a few nights over late summer at Nevil and Michelle’s place merged rapidly into a fortnight, which fused at equal speed into a few weeks, that somehow extended into autumn with: “Well, you might as well stay until spring. The weather’s going to catch you out any day now, and I think it’d be fun for you to spend winter here with us in Alberta.” The birds were busy in the trees, and the air still gave promise of warm if not mild days to come. Five months later and through the inexhaustible dictates of the warmest hospitality—notwithstanding the coldest winter we’ve experienced to date—we’ve become strong contenders for the “Longest lodger” status at the Stowasis.
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22 Aug-31 Oct 2016 – Getting cozy in Canada: settling into the one and only “Stowasis”

A turn in the weather whistled a bolt of cold over my body, goose-fleshing as we journeyed towards Jasper and Banff in Canada’s Alberta province. Cold inquires at first investigated the tips of my fingers, chin and nose, feeling their sharp little claws sink in when my gums were no longer warm. What did I expect from alpine towns—amid the snow-capped Canadian Rockies—revelling in their own microclimates.

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15-21 Aug 2016 – Ice magic, making tracks out of Alaska and a story about Wanda

“Oh look, thar she blows.” Far out in the distance a whale blew, and a pillar of water fountained up. My eyes widened at the calm beauty. Ferrying for the best part of two days from Juneau, Alaksa to Prince Rupert, Canada became our third cruisey foray into exploring Alaska’s Inside Passage, courtesy of its Marine Highway. Taking the slow ferry gave us the flexibility to experience life and logistics as the typical family might along this coastal connection of communities: bring your vehicle, bring your dog (or “marvellous other”), and enjoy what is essentially a poor man’s cruise.

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7-14 Aug 2016 – Still drunk on Juneau: Alaska’s wilderness capital

Where the city ends, Juneau Icefield begins—and keeps going and going. Undoubtedly, its centerpiece is Mendenhall Glacier. Like just about everything else in Southeast Alaska, it sits inside Tongass National Forest. Incredibly, a temperate rainforest no less, which in parts endures more than 16 feet of annual rainfall. No surprise that a fine drizzle falling on the coastal city is often present, wetting the leaves and branches, then gathers into big drops that plop onto your head and arms. Although the rain is such a natural occurrence in Juneau, it almost starts to feel invisible. The incessant murmur on the rooftops wasn’t likely to dampen the euphoria here.

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