6 Oct 2017 – 14 February 2018 – Yahoo! Desert demons and “Gas gas!”

Continue reading

11-12 Aug 2017 – Mayhem in a crystal maze (Previous post: up to 5 Oct 2017)

“Fancy kayaking uris Tracy Arm, and spending the night?” Jason asked me and our mate Josh, an experienced whitewater kayaker with a quiet gravitas about him. This won’t be a day at the beach like itaddling across the lake to Mendenhall Glacier, I was promptly informed. Tracy Arm is a narrow fjord 50 miles southeast of Juneau leading to Sawyer Glacier. There are zero rangers in attendance; it is deep in the Alaskan wilderness. “Okay, let’s do it—what’s the worst that could happen?”

Continue reading

13 May-5 Oct 2017 – “Ground Control to Major Tom”

Yup. It’s been a while. Stark raving mad-as-a-box-of-frogs, the radio silence is o-v-e-r. “Delighted” is a weak term; I’m finally able to relieve the itchy feet as we hit the road again. From late summer last year right through to the onset of spring based in Alberta’s Narnia, this summer found us back in Southeast Alaska—trigger-happy on the humpbacks, (Sony style). U.S. visa expiry and friendship renewal have led us full circle. Fortunate to write the backstory from May 2017 in the comfort of the Stowasis, it’s overwhelming to know how to pack it all in. But pack it in, I will.

Continue reading

16 Jan-13 Apr 2017 – Mad dogs and Englishmen, snow machines and mayhem

What had begun to feel like a protracted ice age—having spent half a year in a landscape leached of colour—followed the joyous onset of spring in Wasilla, Southcentral Alaska. Where the dominion of winter finally permits the release of snow and ice from her frozen prison. A new world about to mysteriously surface, bursting with energy, and the capacity to restore life in all its manifestations.

Continue reading

24 Sept 2016 – 15 Jan 2017 – Goodbye Pearl, two Canadian winter newbies & hello Mr Jangles

The thought of halting our trip was completely untenable. Coming up to three years in maintaining a steady momentum, why would we stop now? Yet staying a few nights over late summer at Nevil and Michelle’s place merged rapidly into a fortnight, which fused at equal speed into a few weeks, that somehow extended into autumn with: “Well, you might as well stay until spring. The weather’s going to catch you out any day now, and I think it’d be fun for you to spend winter here with us in Alberta.” The birds were busy in the trees, and the air still gave promise of warm if not mild days to come. Five months later and through the inexhaustible dictates of the warmest hospitality—notwithstanding the coldest winter we’ve experienced to date—we’ve become strong contenders for the “Longest lodger” status at the Stowasis.
Continue reading